Cedar Mountain

cedarMountainSignTheĀ  Cedar Mountain Community, which embraces Sherwood Forest, is the gateway to some of the best biking and hiking in the area. Dupont Forest with its spectacular waterfalls and trails and Caesar’s Head State Park are literally minutes away. It’s also home to a number of unique shops, businesses, restaurants and historical points of interest:

Commerce

whistlestopMarketWhistle Stop Market, a great local tradition since 2003, carries the best in seasonal produce and local meat, eggs, cheeses and other dairy products, seafood, prepared foods, baked goods and plants. Adjacent to the Whistle Stop is an antique shop crammed with treasures.

Cedar Mountain Cafe is the latest and most exciting spot on the local culinary scene. All menu items are made in-house from locally sourced foods whenever possible, which means the food is not only beautiful and tasty, but incredibly fresh. The meats and eggs are hormone free and the produce is local. Open daily for breakfast and lunch, with dinner served Thursday, Friday & Saturday!

Other nearby conveniences on which we’ve come to depend, include Creekside Market and the Cedar Mountain Quick Stop which carries convenience items and also has a gas station. There’s a computer repair shop down the road. A new shop named Altitude has recently opened offering gifts and homemade crafts.Cedar Mountain Pottery has an eclectic mix of pottery and curiosities. The Cedar Mountain Community Center is the scene of potluck dinners, a flea market on summer weekends and cooking and Zumba classes.

Historical Point of Interest

McGaha Historic ChapelThe McGaha Chapel (AKA The Little River Methodist Episcopal Church) was completed in 1862.The intent to build it was to help heal wounds the Community suffered from its divided loyalties during the War. The Chapel and its pews were hand hewn of local timber and handmade nails and glass. This remarkable spot and its small cemetery are now owned by the Transylvania County Historical Society. Turn onto Holly Cove Road across from the Sherwood Forest Golf Course for the short drive to the Chapel. Its restoration after being abandoned and falling into neglect in the early 1900’s is a story involving many who live in Cedar Mountain today.